A silhouetted man shouts into a microphone at sunset while standing on a beach

SkinIO in the Press

SkinIO in the Press

A silhouetted man shouts into a microphone at sunset while standing on a beach

SkinIO CEO Kyoko Crawford Named One of Chicago's 40 Under 40 by Crain's Chicago Business

After running a New York City-based technology development consultancy for more than a decade, Kyoko Crawford started thinking about launching something tangible— a product she could bring to life.

MetroHealth First Hospital in Ohio with SkinIO

SkinIO is a new, completely non-invasive technology that optimizes skin exams for patients coming into MetroHealth, making its first debut in an Ohio hospital. MetroHealth’s dermatologists use SkinIO to take full-body images of patients’ skin to create their digital skin health record – in 10 minutes or less.

The Skinny on SkinIO

I just wanted to take a second and say how amazed I am with SkinIO. I’ve been using it for a little over a year, so I’m starting to have folks come back in for their second photo sets... This young lady came in for her second scan. SkinIO flagged this spot as new, about 2mm. Didn’t like how it looked under the dermatoscope. It was very asymmetric with globules of pigment. Came back severely dysplastic nevus cannot rule out melanoma! No way a human would have noticed that.

SkinIO Launches Teledermatology

The global COVID-19 pandemic makes clear the critical need for doctors to connect with patients virtually and today SkinIO, a digital mole-mapping system, announced SkinIO Teledermatology, a new platform that allows dermatologists to capture high-quality from patients to enable the best possible remote dermatological care.

Pain-Free Dermatology Visits

Dr. Deirdre Hooper from Audubon Dermatology in New Orleans, LA talks to Meg Gatto from Fox 8 Local News about SkinIO’s innovative iPad-based imaging.

Nextech and SkinIO Partner

Nextech Systems, a leading provider of healthcare technology solutions for specialty physician practices, today announces its new partnership with SkinIO. This partnership allows Nextech’s dermatology clients to integrate with the latest technology in healthcare that provides a fast and easy in-office full-body imaging system.

Phase I Clinical Trial

Although some smartphone applications are designed for total body photography (TBP), few offer the specificity that enables self- as well as dermatologist-, detection of new lesions, or change in lesion color or in size as little as 1mm, on an ongoing basis. The aim of this study is to assess the sensitivity of a novel TBP application in the detection of changes to color and size of simulated skin lesions.

Designing Applications for Health Care with Kyoko Crawford and Mark Yoon

Where we think this technology can play a role is to take the onus out of deciding what to target as a consumer patient.

SkinIO’s technology makes skin cancer screening more accessible to patients

The Chicago-based startup’s goal is to enable patients to monitor their skin over time, thereby improving the chances of detecting skin cancer early.

Detecting Skin Cancer in the "Dermatology Desert"

This ever-increasing supply-demand mismatch is exacerbating what we're already experiencing—patients' lack of access to appropriate dermatologic care and time inefficiencies within our own practices...

App scans photos for signs of skin cancer, flags them for doctors

...The app is the brainchild of Dr. J.C. Lapiere, who has devoted his life to treating skin cancers. Since the worst spots often show up in places patients can't see, he found a way to shine a light on dark spots.

This Startup Wants to Help Fight Skin Cancer

SkinIO, a new Chicago-based startup, is helping people prevent skin cancer by providing a service that allows them to regularly monitor their skin with the help of artificial intelligence and licensed dermatologists.

SkinIO's plan to combat skin cancer? A mobile app

Designed to be as easy to use as possible, SkinIO lets a patient capture a full-body photography in less than five minutes. The patient’s images are then run through a computer vision-powered mapping system that automatically flags moles and other skin aberrations.